Seattle Seahawks and “The Call”

Sad Seahawk

It has been five days since the 12th Man was stunned by the Seahawks loss to the New England Patriots.  Not sure how anyone else felt but for me, it was a blow to the stomach and I had all the air knocked out of me.

I haven’t looked at a sports page, listened to very little sports talk radio and have avoided the NFL Network and ESPN altogether.  Because I just can’t stand how the last call of the game has been diagnosed to the Nth degree.

I allowed myself some time to get through this.  This loss was more difficult to process mainly because of the suddenness of it.  We were right there at the one yard line, Russell Wilson calmly at the line and then New England rookie Malcom Butler drove the stake into the heart with an amazing play.

A lot of things have been said about “The Call.”  Some have indicated it was the worst call in Super Bowl history.  Others have wondered long and hard that why, with 26 seconds on the clock and with the freak of nature running Marshawn Lynch in the backfield, would you even consider throwing a pass.

Here is what I know:

  • I am not the head coach of the Seattle Seahawks with 80,000 screaming fans yelling, all kinds of traffic coming in on the headset, trying to make a decision in 45 seconds.
  • I am not the quarterback who has such a belief in the system he plays in, that he never considered questioning the call.
  • I am not the wide receiver who was assigned to bump the corner back.
  • I am not the receiver who was supposed to make the move to the ball.

We can all sit back, with the help of instant replay, stop action and slow motion in high-definition media, tear apart the play frame by frame.  We can drag a play that took all of four seconds to execute, into a full 10 minute dissertation on every single thing that supposedly went wrong.

When the play occurred, there wasn’t a Seahawk fan that didn’t think the Seahawks weren’t going to score and be the first repeat champions since the New England Patriots.

But it wasn’t just that play that got us.  The spectacular interception by Jeremy Lane in the first quarter and in instant later, after being tackled, he is out of the game with a severe broken wrist.

Earl Thomas, who stated that if the Super Bowl had been played the previous week, he would not have been able to play with that injured shoulder.

Richard Sherman was not near 100% with a rotator cuff injury he sustained while playing in the NFC Championship.

Kam Chancellor wasn’t sure if he was going to be able to play due to a knee injury sustained at the Friday before Super Bowl practice.  Through what Pete Carroll calls a superhuman effort, Chancellor strapped on a speed brace and gutted it out.

Cliff Avril, so key all year long on the defensive line, went out in the third quarter with a concussion.

And even with all the injuries, the Seahawks were right there, poised to win the game with yet another spectacular comeback.

But we just didn’t quite make it…and we are all trying to find a place to place the blame.  You know what?  There is no one to blame.  The play was called, the players actually executed the play fairly well and Malcom Butler just made a great play.

There is one last thing I can say about this:  It’s over, it happened and we still have one helluva football team to cheer for.

The Seahawks will learn from this…they will use it to come back stronger and hungrier than before and be one of the rare teams to make a Super Bowl appearance three years straight.

It’s just gonna seem like one helluva long wait!

Go Seahawks!

 

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *